FOR YOUR RECONSIDERATION

SHORTLISTS FOR THE 2ND VINTAGE FILM AWARDS

 

VINTAGE FILM OF 1996 | SHORTLIST

VINTAGE FILM OF 1986 | SHORTLIST

VINTAGE FILM OF 1976 | SHORTLIST

 

1st VFA WINNERS ANNOUNCED

Download the press release here
 

VINTAGE FILM OF 1995

Seven Director: David Fincher Writers: Andrew Kevin Walker

"There are some things that you see, and you can't unsee them," explains Joaquin Phoenix to Nicolas Cage in the 1998 film 8mm, and you can't help but think he's leading him down a dark alley to see a midnight screening of Seven. Ostensibly a clichéd police procedural - a retiring detective on his last case breaks in his hotshot new partner - Seven, er, proceeds to scare the living daylights out of you.

See trailer and synopsis

ZEITGEIST FILM OF 1995

While You Were Sleeping Director: Jon Turteltaub Writers: Daniel G. Sullivan, Fredric Lebow

Boy wakes up from a coma, meets girl pretending to be his fiancée. Ex malo bonum: it's Sandra Bullock. When you're disappointed by the latest formulaic rom com, it's likely because it wasn't half as good as While You Were Sleeping, which is one of the reasons the formula exists.

See trailer and synopsis

VINTAGE FILM OF 1985

Back to the Future Director: Robert Zemeckis Writers: Bob Gale, Robert Zemeckis

Huey Lewis hits, DeLoreans, paisley-lined jean jackets, shoebox-sized camcorders, people calling an SUV a "four-by-four" ...indeed, the blockbuster that recreated the 1950s so perfectly is now a time capsule of the 1980s. Back to the Future's greatest merit - being good clean fun - has never gone out of style.

See trailer and synopsis
"I'm honored to have it.  The longevity of Back to the Future still amazes and delights me." - Bob Gale, screenwriter
"We are very appreciative of the support given to our movie…and for the statue which we just recently received. Back to the Future had some excellent competition so the honor is very special." - Robert Zemeckis, director and screenwriter

ZEITGEIST FILM OF 1985

St. Elmo’s Fire Director: Joel Schumacher Writers: Carl Kurlander, Joel Schumacher

Long before asking which Friends character they had become at 30, Gen Xers asked themselves which of the St. Elmo's crew they hoped to be at 22. Beyond the "right now" (then) of seeing all of these John Hughes High alums together, St. Elmo's Fire introduced the world to Andie MacDowell (her first speaking role - is she ever in a bad movie?) and delivered a blast from the coming-of-age past by casting Martin Balsam as a concerned dad.

See trailer and synopsis
"(The VFA Zeitgeist Award) means so much, especially considering that the film was up against some of my favorite films from the 80s." - Carl Kurlander, screenwriter

VINTAGE FILM OF 1975

Jaws Director: Steven Spielberg Writers: Carl Gottlieb, Peter Benchley

Jaws requires no synopsis, so here’s the backstory: A guy was browsing through Cosmopolitan (he had his reasons) and saw a positive review of this book by first-time novelist Peter Benchley; one thing led to another, and the book became became Steven Spielberg’s ur-blockbuster that changed Hollywood forever.

See trailer and synopsis
"Thanks very much for the unexpected honor, I’m pleased to be a recipient of the Vintage Film Award....I look forward to displaying it proudly." - Carl Gottlieb, screenwriter

ZEITGEIST FILM OF 1975

The Rocky Horror Picture Show Director: Jim Sharman Writers: Richard O'Brien, Jim Sharman

A platoon of LGBT space aliens wreak havoc on the lives of the Perfect Couple. Barry Bostwick, the straight man in this comedy, gets his comeuppance repeatedly; as his fiancé, Susan Saradon is the Sears Catalog come to life. But it’s Tim Curry who steals the show (along with everybody’s clothes). It’s the longest continuous release in cinematic history (40 years and counting). It’s the quintessential midnight movie. And it has Meat Loaf.

See trailer and synopsis
"Thanks…for this delightful tribute to my work. We often work in the dark, never knowing if our creations are going to resonate with others and so, these two 'thank you gifts' are most welcome" - Richard O’Brien, screenwriter

VINTAGE FILM OF 1965

Thunderball Director: Terence Young Writers: Richard Maibaum, John Hopkins

Probably the movie Don Draper was watching: SPECTRE has stolen two atomic bombs and wants NATO to pay £100 million (go ahead, point that pinkie) to get them back. 007 to the rescue. It's got a jetpack, a shark tank, and a villain (Blofeld) who's back 50 years later.

See trailer and synopsis

ZEITGEIST FILM OF 1965

Cat Ballou Director: Elliot Silverstein Writers: Walter Newman, Frank Pierson

The Farrelly Brothers have called Cat Ballou their favorite film, and it's not just because there's something about Jane Fonda (it was actually Lee Marvin, playing two roles, who won all the trophies from L.A. to Berlin). The original spoof of the Western genre, Cat also features Nat King Cole’s final screen appearance.

See trailer and synopsis

VINTAGE PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR 1995

Morgan Freeman
as Detective Somerset in Seven

"There are some things that you see, and you can't unsee them," explains Joaquin Phoenix to Nicolas Cage in the 1998 film 8mm, and you can't help but think he's leading him down a dark alley to see a midnight screening of Seven. Ostensibly a clichéd police procedural - a retiring detective on his last case breaks in his hotshot new partner - Seven, er, proceeds to scare the living daylights out of you.

See trailer and synopsis

VINTAGE PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR 1985

Michael J. Fox
as Marty McFly in Back to the Future

Huey Lewis hits, DeLoreans, paisley-lined jean jackets, shoebox-sized camcorders, people calling an SUV a "four-by-four" ...indeed, the blockbuster that recreated the 1950s so perfectly is now a time capsule of the 1980s. Back to the Future's greatest merit - being good clean fun - has never gone out of style.

See trailer and synopsis
"I'm honored to have it.  The longevity of Back to the Future still amazes and delights me." - Bob Gale, screenwriter
"We are very appreciative of the support given to our movie…and for the statue which we just recently received. Back to the Future had some excellent competition so the honor is very special." - Robert Zemeckis, director and screenwriter

VINTAGE PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR 1975

Jack Nicholson
as Randle McMurphy in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Leading a multiracial ensemble cast, the leading man (Jack Nicholson) is a statutory rape convict in a mental hospital whose inmates are psychologically and physically tortured by the sadistic Nurse Ratched. Adapted from Ken Kesey's novel, Miloš Forman's film swept the awards in 1975-6. Pretty much everyone agrees it’s among history’s greatest films, but would it be your first choice to watch tonight?

See trailer and synopsis

VINTAGE PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS 1995

Alicia Silverstone
as Cher Horowitz in Clueless

As if Clueless wouldn’t be on the shortlist for a VFA. Hello? It, like, totally launched the careers of Alicia Silverstone, Paul Rudd, and Brittany Murphy. It's based on one of those Tracy Austin books, which are totally classic. In conclusion, it would be like the Pismo Beach disaster if it didn't win.

See trailer and synopsis

VINTAGE PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS 1985

Whoopi Goldberg
as Celie Harris Johnson in The Color Purple

This outstanding period drama introduced us to Whoopi Goldberg, Oprah Winfrey, and Steven Spielberg's serious side. Alice Walker's novel, from which the screenplay was adapted, won the Pulitzer Prize, but the film version was shut out at the Oscars - tying the record for the most nominations (11) without a statue.

See trailer and synopsis

VINTAGE PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS 1975

Susan Sarandon
as Janet Weiss in The Rocky Horror Picture Show

A platoon of LGBT space aliens wreak havoc on the lives of the Perfect Couple. Barry Bostwick, the straight man in this comedy, gets his comeuppance repeatedly; as his fiancé, Susan Saradon is the Sears Catalog come to life. But it’s Tim Curry who steals the show (along with everybody’s clothes). It’s the longest continuous release in cinematic history (40 years and counting). It’s the quintessential midnight movie. And it has Meat Loaf.

See trailer and synopsis
"Thanks…for this delightful tribute to my work. We often work in the dark, never knowing if our creations are going to resonate with others and so, these two 'thank you gifts' are most welcome" - Richard O’Brien, screenwriter

VINTAGE SOUNDTRACK SONG 1995

Coolio
"Gangsta's Paradise" from Dangerous Minds

Coolio’s “Rollin' with My Homies” figured in the plot of another VFA-nominated 1995 film (Clueless), but it was this international chart-topper from Dangerous Minds that was the runaway favorite in our survey.

See trailer and synopsis

VINTAGE SOUNDTRACK SONG 1985

Simple Minds
"Don't You (Forget About Me)" from The Breakfast Club

1985 was a great year for soundtracks, and this classic by Simple Minds beat out some tough competition in our survey, including “The Power of Love,” “St. Elmo’s Fire (Man in Motion” and “Crazy for You.”

See trailer and synopsis

VINTAGE SOUNDTRACK SONG 1975

Richard O’Brien
"The Time Warp" from The Rocky Horror Picture Show

From one of the best-selling soundtracks of all time, this was the favorite in our survey.

See trailer and synopsis
"Thanks…for this delightful tribute to my work. We often work in the dark, never knowing if our creations are going to resonate with others and so, these two 'thank you gifts' are most welcome" - Richard O’Brien, songwriter and performer
 
 

Welcome to Vintage Film Awards ™

Every year, established critics and awards shows tell you what you should watch…
– but what do you want to watch? Ask yourself: Can you quote more lines from The Color of Money or from Top Gun? Would you be more surprised if a friend had never seen Nixon, or if they’d somehow missed Clueless?

Latest News

May 11th, 2016

THE VINTAGE FILM AWARDS winners announced.
Download Pdf

January 2017

VINTAGE FILM AWARDS shortlists announced for 1966, 1976, 1986 and 1996 films.