SHORTLIST VINTAGE FILM OF 1967

Cool Hand Luke

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE ©Warner Bros.

Cool Hand Luke

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

Early in his life, Donn Pearce was caught lying about his age. Then AWOL. Counterfeiting dollars and cracking safes, too, the latter offense landing him a two-year stint on a Florida chain gang. He survived the chain gang to tell the tale of it in the novel that became the screenplay that immortalized Cool Hand Luke’s most famous line: What we have here is a failure to communicate. Clearly that’s a lie, too: it is one of the most quoted lines in film history.

Director: Stuart Rosenberg

Starring: Dennis Hopper, George Kennedy, Harry Dean Stanton, Paul Newman, Strother Martin

Major nominations on original release : Academy Award nominations for Best Actor (Newman), Best Supporting Actor (Kennedy - won).

The Graduate

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE © Rialto Pictures

The Graduate

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

Plastics? A bunch of Hollywood A-listers missed the boat by not investing in this film instead, which grossed $105 million on a $3 million budget (a 3400% return): Doris Day, Patricia Neal, Faye Dunaway, and Shirley MacLaine all turned down opportunities to play either Mrs. Robinson or her daughter Elaine (Natalie Wood turned down both!). Dustin Hoffman, who was directing community theater in Fargo, North Dakota before taking the role as Ben Braddock, clearly made better decisions than all of them, becoming an icon along with Paul Simon and the Alfa Romeo Spider.

Director: Mike Nichols

Starring: Anne Bancroft, Dustin Hoffman, Katharine Ross

Major nominations on original release : None

In the Heat of the Night

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE © Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc

In the Heat of the Night

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

When a dead body is found at 3:30 a.m. in small-town Mississippi, the only person without an alibi is a black man waiting at the train station named Virgil Tibbs (Poitier). Removed from suspicion after proving he is a homicide detective with the Philadelphia police, Tibbs is then reluctantly enlisted to help solve the crime. In the process, when slapped by a racist plantation owner, Tibbs makes history by slapping him right back.

Director: Norman Jewison

Starring: Rod Steiger, Sidney Poitier

Major nominations on original release : Academy Award nominations for Best Picture (won), Best Director, Best Actor (Steiger - won), Best Adapted Screenplay (won); BAFTA nominations for Best Foreign Actor (Steiger - won, Poitier).

Bonnie and Clyde

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE ©Warner Bros.

Bonnie and Clyde

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

Widely considered to be the first major film to glorify criminal violence, Bonnie and Clyde was intended at first to be a French New Wave film; its eventual star and producer, Warren Beatty, bought the rights to the script after Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard passed on the project; it became something a little more colorful. 50 years later, is it still the must-see film of 1967?

Director: Arthur Penn

Starring: Estelle Parsons, Faye Dunaway, Gene Hackman, Michael J. Pollard, Warren Beatty

Major nominations on original release : Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, Best Actor, Best Actress, Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons - won), Supporting Actor (Hackman and Pollard). BAFTA nominations for Best Film, Best Foreign Actor (Beatty).

To Sir, with Love

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE © Archive Photos

To Sir, with Love

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

1967 gave us the Summer of Love, but Billboard’s #1 song of the year was neither the Beatles’ “All You Need is Love” (#30) nor Jefferson Airplane’s “Somebody to Love” – it was, in fact, this hit film’s title song, in which Lulu asks, “How do you thank someone who has taken you from crayons to perfume?” That “someone” would be an unemployed engineer named Thackeray (Poitier) who takes work as a high school teacher who, according to the trailer, “joins battle with the wildest set of rebels London ever produced.” He wins them over, and the film has inspired numerous others since, including 1995’s VFA Soundtrack winner Dangerous Minds.

Director: James Clavell

Starring: Christian Roberts, Judy Geeson, Sidney Poitier

Major nominations on original release : None

Wait Until Dark

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE © Warner Bros.

Wait Until Dark

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

Of all the Audrey Hepburn films featuring music by Henry Mancini, the scariest is easily this home invasion thriller that shocks the senses: Hepburn’s character can’t see, and Mancini’s orchestra features two pianos out of tune with each other. If you don’t think a 50-year-old film can scare you, consider this: Hepburn’s top-billed co-star Alan Arkin had a full head of hair before it came out.

Director: Terence Young

Starring: Alan Arkin, Audrey Hepburn, Richard Crenna

Major nominations on original release : Academy Award for Best Actress.

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE © Columbia Pictures

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

The wealthy, liberal Draytons (Tracy and Hepburn) think of interracial marriage the way you’d imagine they thought about public schooling: they support the idea but hadn’t ever imagined it for their daughter, who comes home from a Hawaiian vacation engaged to a widower named Dr. John Prentice (Poitier). Neither of Prentice’s parents nor the Draytons’ black maid is thrilled about it, either; a visiting priest is about the only one who gives his immediate blessing. Released in December, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner marked the end of a year of great changes in American society, and a pivotal year in American cinema: It was at once the final on-screen Tracy/Hepburn pairing and the last of Poitier’s three hit films that year – which grossed a combined $123 million, making him the most bankable star of 1967. Will it win out voters blessing as the Vintage Film of 1967?

Director: Stanley Kramer

Starring: Beah Richards, Cecil Kellaway, Katharine Hepburn, Katharine Houghton, Sidney Poitier, Spencer Tracy

Major nominations on original release : Academy Award for Best Picture, Director, Original Screenplay (won), Actor (Tracy), Actress (Hepburn - won), Supporting Actor (Kellaway), Supporting Actress (Richards); BAFTA for Best Actor (Tracy - won), Best Actress (Hepburn - won).

Le Samouraï (The Samurai)

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE © Rialto Pictures

Le Samouraï (The Samurai)

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

Melville’s neo-noir classic has a few things in common with the VFA winner for 1966, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: It was filmed in Europe, features a laconic anti-hero, has continuing influence (most recently on Drive), and was nominated for absolutely nothing when it came out 50 years earlier. Of the two VFA-shortlisted 1966 films rocking a “100% fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes (Cool Hand Luke is the other), Le Samouraï is the only one Madonna ever sang about.

Director: Jean-Pierre Melville

Starring: Alain Delon, Cathy Rosier, François Périer, Nathalie Delon

Major nominations on original release : None

Thoroughly Modern Millie

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE © Michael Ochs Archives

Thoroughly Modern Millie

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

“The Happiest Picture in Years,” boasts the trailer, and it’s hardly biased to say Millie is easily the most cheerful celluloid romp on the 1967 VFA shortlist. It’s based on a 1956 British musical and became a Broadway show in 2002, so never mind the plot – it’s got Julie Andrews singing catchy tunes, Mary Tyler Moore in zany mode, flappers doing something like the Time Warp, and Carol Channing doing jazz hands.

Director: George Roy Hill

Starring: Carol Channing, James Fox, Julie Andrews, Mary Tyler Moore

Major nominations on original release : Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress (Channing).

The Dirty Dozen

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

IMAGE © Warner Bros

The Dirty Dozen

Shortlist for Vintage Film of 1967

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2018.

So studded with studly stars, Donald Sutherland is billed twelfth. Hoping to disrupt the enemy in advance of D-Day, the U.S. Army trains a squad of convicts to take on a high-risk mission – storming a castle full of Nazi officers in occupied France. Critics of the day frowned upon sadism-fueled plot, but the times they were a changin’: By 1993, the halfway point between The Dirty Dozen and Inglourious Basterds, Tom Hanks and Victor Garber were making light of the brutal finale in Sleepless in Seattle. Is it tough enough to win the VFA?

Director: Robert Aldrich

Starring: Charles Bronson, Ernest Borgnine, George Kennedy, Jim Brown, John Cassavetes, Lee Marvin, Telly Savalas

Major nominations on original release : Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor (Cassavetes).